Short-term effects of air pollution on respiratory and circulatory morbidity in colombia 2011–2014: A multi-city, time-series analysis

Laura Andrea Rodríguez-Villamizar, Néstor Yezid Rojas-Roa, Luis Camilo Blanco-Becerra, Víctor Mauricio Herrera-Galindo, Julián Alfredo Fernández-Niño

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Few studies have been conducted on the effect of air pollution on morbidity in Latin America. This study analyzed the effects of air pollution on respiratory and circulatory morbidity in four major cities in Colombia. An ecological time-series analysis was conducted with pollution data from air quality monitoring networks and information on emergency department visits between 2011 and 2014. Daily 24-h averages were calculated for NO2, PM10, PM2.5, and SO2 as well as 8-h averages for CO and O3. Separate time-series were constructed by disease group and pollutant. Conditional negative binomial regression models were used with average population effects. Effects were calculated for the same day and were adjusted for weather conditions, age groups, and their interactions. The results showed that effects of some of the pollutants differed among the cities. For NO2, PM10, and PM2.5, the multi-city models showed greater and statistically significant percentage increases in emergency department visits for respiratory diseases, particularly for the 5 to 9-year-old age group. These same pollutants also significantly affected the rate of emergency department visits for circulatory diseases, especially for the group of persons over 60 years of age.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1610
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume15
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2018

Keywords

  • Adverse effects
  • Air pollution
  • Colombia
  • Epidemiology
  • Morbidity

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