Seropositivity and history of hospitalization for dengue in relation to anthropometric indices among Colombian children and adults

M. R. Barry, L. A. Villar, O. F. Herrán, A. Lozano-Parra, M. I. Estupiñán, V. M. Herrera, E. Villamor

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1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The role of anthropometric status on dengue is uncertain. We investigated the relations between anthropometric characteristics (height, body mass index, and waist circumference [WC]) and two dengue outcomes, seropositivity and hospitalization, in a cross-sectional study of 2038 children (ages 2-15 y) and 408 adults (ages 18-72 y) from Bucaramanga, Colombia. Anthropometric variables were standardized by age and sex in children. Seropositivity was determined through IgG antibodies; past hospitalization for dengue was self-reported. We modeled the prevalence of each outcome by levels of anthropometric exposures using generalized estimating equations with restricted cubic splines. In children, dengue seropositivity was 60.8%; 9.9% of seropositive children reported prior hospitalization for dengue. WC was positively associated with seropositivity in girls (90th vs. 10th percentile adjusted prevalence ratio [APR]=1.19; 95% CI: 1.03, 1.36). Among adults, dengue seropositivity was 95.1%; 8.1% of seropositive adults reported past hospitalization. Height was inversely associated with seropositivity (APR=0.90; 95% CI: 0.83, 0.99) and with hospitalization history (APR=0.19; 95% CI: 0.04, 0.79). WC was inversely associated with seropositivity (APR=0.89; 95% CI: 0.81, 0.98). We conclude that anthropometry correlates with a history of dengue, but could not determine causation. Prospective studies are warranted to enhance causal inference on these questions.

Original languageEnglish
JournalEpidemiology and Infection
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Anthropometry
  • Body mass index
  • Dengue
  • Height
  • Waist circumference

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