Prevalencia de demencia en adultos mayores de América Latina: revisión sistemática

Translated title of the contribution: Prevalence of dementia in the elderly in Latin America: A systematic review

Cristina Zurique Sánchez, Miguel Oswaldo Cadena Sanabria, Marina Zurique Sánchez, Paul Anthony Camacho López, Marina Sánchez Sanabria, Santiago Hernández Hernández, Karen Velásquez Vanegas, Andrea Ustate Valera

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and objective: Dementia is a growing public health problem. It involves the impairment of several cognitive functions, generating mental and physical disability, and therefore greater functional dependence. There is limited epidemiological information which reveals an approximate prevalence in older adults from Latin America. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of dementia in the older adult population of Latin America, and its distribution according to geographic area and gender. Materials and methods: A systematic review was carried out in databases: PubMed, Ovid, Lilacs, Cochrane, Scielo and Google Scholar, in order to identify studies that estimate the prevalence of dementia in urban and / or rural population over 65 years of age. Results: On February 2018, the literature search yielded 357 publications. The overall prevalence of dementia in the older adult population of Latin America was found to be 11%, prevailing more in female gender and urban people. Conclusion: The prevalence of dementia in Latin America is higher than registered previously, and even than in other continents.

Translated title of the contributionPrevalence of dementia in the elderly in Latin America: A systematic review
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)346-355
Number of pages10
JournalRevista Espanola de Geriatria y Gerontologia
Volume54
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2019
Externally publishedYes

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