Different outcomes for transplant-eligible newly diagnosed multiple myeloma patients in Latin America according to the public versus private management: a GELAMM study

Camila Peña, Eloisa Riva, Natalia Schutz, Luz Tarín-Arzaga, Humberto Martínez-Cordero, Virginia Bove, Rocío Osorio, Mauricio Chandía, Cecilia Beltrán, Javier Schulz, Daniela Cardemil, Carolina Contreras, Carmen Gloria Vergara, Javiera Donoso, Marcela Espinoza, Gabriel La Rocca, Hernán López-Vidal, Pilar León, Christine Rojas Hopkins, Pablo SotoSandra Aranda, Vivianne Torres, Macarena Roa, Paola Ochoa, Patricio Jose Duarte, Guillermina Remaggi, Sebastián Yantorno, Ariel Corzo, Soledad Zabaljauregui, Claudia Shanley, Sergio Lopresti, Sergio Orlando, Verónica Verri, Luis Quiroga, Carlos García, Vanesa Fernández, Jhoanna Ramirez, Alicia Molina, María Pacheco, Alex Mite, Inés Reyes, Brenner Sabando, Francisca Ramírez, Claudia Sossa, Virginia Abello, Henry Idrobo, Kenny Mauricio Galvez Cardenas, Domingo Saavedra, Guillermo Quintero, Raimundo Gazitúa, Lina Gaviria, Rigoberto Gomez, Mónica Osuna, Alicia Henao-Uribe, Omar Cantú-Martínez, David Gómez-Almaguer, Yarely Itzayana García-Navarrete, Antonio Cruz-Mora, Yahveth Cantero-Fortiz, Guillermo J. Ruiz-Argüelles, Dorotea Fantl

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2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The aim of this study was to describe clinical and survival characteristics of transplant-eligible multiple myeloma (MM) patients in Latin America (LA), with a special focus on differences between public and private healthcare facilities. We included 1293 patients diagnosed between 2010 and 2018. A great disparity in outcomes and survival between both groups was observed. Late diagnosis and low access to adequate frontline therapy and ASCT in public institutions probably explain these differences. Patients treated with novel drug induction protocols, followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) and maintenance, have similar overall survival compared to that published internationally.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3112-3119
Number of pages8
JournalLeukemia and Lymphoma
Volume61
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Latin America
  • Multiple myeloma
  • autologous stem cell transplantation
  • proteasome inhibitor

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